Latest Nepal Earthquakes Likely Part of Chain Reaction


http://earthchangesmedia.com/latest-nepal-earthquakes-likely-part-of-chain-reaction
The two large earthquakes that struck Nepal on Tuesday were likely part of a chain reaction triggered by the magnitude-7.8 temblor that ravaged the country April 25 and weakened other fractures in the earth’s crust, according to seismologists.

While it is impossible to predict the exact timing o…

The two large earthquakes that struck Nepal on Tuesday were likely part of a chain reaction triggered by the magnitude-7.8 temblor that ravaged the country April 25 and weakened other fractures in the earth’s crust, according to seismologists.

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While it is impossible to predict the exact timing of an earthquake, the occurrence of another large quake in the region wasn’t a surprise to experts. The movement caused by the first quake added extra stress to other faults in the area, increasing the likelihood of further seismic activity, according to Carmen Solana, a geologist and professor in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Portsmouth in England.

Nepal is susceptible to earthquakes because of the regular movement of the fault line along its southern border, where the Indian and Eurasian tectonic plates collide. As the plates push against each other, friction generates stress and energy that builds until the crust ruptures, releasing energy, and, in the case of the April 25 quake, destruction. More than 8,000 people died.

After that earthquake, some seismologists said not enough energy had been released from that part of the Himalayas and that a further earthquake was possible, according to Nigel Harris, professor of tectonics at the Open University in the U.K.

The epicenter of Tuesday’s first earthquake was located at the eastern end of the fault region that shifted during the April 25 earthquake. It is “consistent with rupture on the deeper extension of the same fault as it dips to the north, under the Himalayas,” Richard Walters, an earthquake geophysicist at England’s University of Leeds, said in a news release.

There have been nearly 100 aftershocks of magnitude 3 or higher following the April earthquake. In the first two hours after Tuesday’s first quake, there were six aftershocks, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Tuesday’s first quake, with a magnitude of 7.3, occurred about 16 kilometers below the earth’s surface, relatively shallow, according to USGS, like the one in April. Shallower earthquakes tend to cause more damage than deeper ones.

Tuesday’s quakes make it likely that large aftershocks will continue for days to weeks, which may further weaken buildings and cause landslides and avalanches, according to Sandy Steacy, head of the school of physical sciences at the University of Adelaide in Australia.

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About Earth Changes Media w/ Mitch Battros

Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.
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