Tropical Storm Noul To Strengthen Into Typhoon, Possibly Threaten Philippines


http://earthchangesmedia.com/tropical-storm-noul-to-strengthen-into-typhoon-possibly-threaten-philippines
Tropical Storm Noul has flared up in the western Pacific Ocean and may threaten the Philippines this weekend.

Noul, the western Pacific basin’s sixth named tropical cyclone of the year, is about 485 miles southwest of Guam, and will pose no threat to the U.S. territory.
Tropical storm…

Tropical Storm Noul has flared up in the western Pacific Ocean and may threaten the Philippines this weekend.

storm

Noul, the western Pacific basin’s sixth named tropical cyclone of the year, is about 485 miles southwest of Guam, and will pose no threat to the U.S. territory.

Tropical storm warnings are in effect for the atolls of Ulithi and Fais. The center of Noul is slowly moving to the west, thanks to weak steering winds aloft.

These areas are likely seeing tropical storm-force winds and locally heavy rainfall.

Just over one month ago, Ulithi, home to 700 to 800 people, was raked by Super Typhoon Maysak.

Noul is expected to reach typhoon status (same as Category 1 equivalent hurricane) soon, as the center passes to the north of Yap Island.

A typhoon warning is in effect for Yap Island. Tropical storm-force winds are possible by Tuesday morning, local time, and, if the center passes close enough, typhoon-force winds are possible on Yap Island overnight Tuesday night into Wednesday morning, according to the National Weather Service in Guam.

Noul Forecast Path

After departing Yap Island, Noul is expected to strengthen, possibly attaining Category 4 equivalent (131 mph) or super typhoon (150 mph) status by late in the week.

How serious of a threat is this for the Philippines?

At this time, the future track of Noul, known as “Dodong” in the Philippines, remains uncertain, with two possibilities:

1) A sharp northward turn, missing the northern Philippines well to the east.

2) A continued west-northwest track toward the northern half of the Philippines this weekend.

Even if the Philippines’ track (No. 2 above) was to occur, Noul/Dodong could weaken before reaching the islands. Such was the case with the former Super Typhoon Maysak, which diminished to a tropical storm before reaching northern Luzon in early April.

Western Pacific tropical cyclones, known as typhoons when they reach hurricane-equivalent status, can form any time of year.

Owing partially to this year-round calendar of potential development, roughly one-third of all the Earth’s tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Basin. On average, 25 tropical cyclones form each year in the western Pacific Basin, with 15-16 of those strengthening to Category 1 equivalent typhoons.

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About Earth Changes Media w/ Mitch Battros

Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.
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