Storm Hits California After Triggering Washington Flooding


http://earthchangesmedia.com/storm-hits-california-after-triggering-washington-flooding
A storm sweeping down the West Coast pelted parts of the San Francisco Bay Area with much-needed rain Friday, triggered flooding that swamped several homes in Washington state, and unleashed hurricane-force winds in Nevada.
Up to 10 inches of rain expected this weekend in parts of the…

A storm sweeping down the West Coast pelted parts of the San Francisco Bay Area with much-needed rain Friday, triggered flooding that swamped several homes in Washington state, and unleashed hurricane-force winds in Nevada.

Up to 10 inches of rain expected this weekend in parts of the drought-stricken region won’t make a significant dent in the state’s historic drought, but it’s a welcome change after six dry weeks in the Bay Area. For the first time in recorded history, there was no measurable rainfall in downtown San Francisco in January, when winter rains usually come.

It would take 150 percent of the average rainfall for California to recover from the dry period, state water resource officials say. But snow is more important than rain because snowpack supplies about a third of the water needed by residents, agriculture and industry.

About 26 miles west of Seattle, an overflowing river inundated at least a half dozen homes on the Olympic Peninsula. Rescuers went door to door in Brinnon to check homes on a road partially blocked by a mudslide, Jefferson County Emergency Management spokeswoman Keppie Keplinger said.

Three people were rescued from a flooded pickup truck Friday morning, but none was injured, she said.

The threat of landslides will persist into the weekend, and weather officials warn of flooding in several rivers in western Washington. Oregon also saw flooding on roadways.

In the Sierra Nevada spanning California and Nevada, strong winds blinded drivers, causing multiple car crashes. The wind snapped massive trees, closed ski resorts around Lake Tahoe and knocked out power to thousands. A 134 mph gust recorded early Friday near the Mount Rose Ski Resort southeast of Reno led the facility and two others to close.

At least a dozen people were hurt in multiple crashes on Nevada highways. No deaths were reported, but nine people were hospitalized in a crash on a stretch of U.S. Highway 95A that involved at least eight vehicles. Three other people were hospitalized with minor injuries after five cars crashed on U.S. 395 north of Reno near the California line.

NV Energy reported more than 3,000 customers in Carson City and nearly 2,000 in Reno-Sparks were without power at noon Friday as the winter storm blew into the area after a record high of 70 degrees in Reno the day before.

North of San Francisco, businesses in Marin, Napa, Solano, and Sonoma counties stacked sandbags to prepare for possible flash flooding from swollen waterways as rain started falling in the North Bay.

Winds of up to 15 mph were recorded east of the city Friday morning, and the blustery weather knocked down trees and caused power outages, the National Weather Service said. Pacific Gas & Electric reported several thousand outages Friday in the Bay Area.

San Francisco International Airport saw delays of up to 90 minutes and about 175 flights canceled Friday.

The storm is expected to drop rain through Sunday, and the National Weather Service issued a heavy-rain, high wind-gust and flash-flood warning for the region through Monday.

The heaviest downpours are forecast in the North Bay, where up to 7 inches of rain is expected to overwhelm waterways and roadway-drainage systems, leading to flash flooding.

Urban areas could see up to 4 inches of moisture, while Marin and Sonoma counties could see 10 inches through Sunday, weather service lead forecaster Roger Gass said.

Rain has been nearly nonexistent across much of California and Nevada since Dec. 20, halting hopes for the drought to improve. California’s second snow survey this winter found the Sierra Nevada snowpack is far below normal after a dry, unusually warm January. A greater snowpack translates to more water for California reservoirs to meet demand in summer and fall.

Water resources managers said heavy rain and cooler temperatures in the next three months would be required for the snowpack to build and give Californians hope for beginning to recover from the drought this year.

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About Earth Changes Media w/ Mitch Battros

Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.
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