Evacuations and Flood Watch as Powerful Storm Gets Ready to Hit SoCal


http://earthchangesmedia.com/evacuations-and-flood-watch-as-powerful-storm-gets-ready-to-hit-socal
Voluntary evacuations were taking place and a flash flood watch was in effect in SoCal ahead of a powerful storm due to hit the area Tuesday Morning.
It comes after a Sunday soaker that brought more than an inch of rain to some parts of Southern California.
Voluntary evacuations for the…

Voluntary evacuations were taking place and a flash flood watch was in effect in SoCal ahead of a powerful storm due to hit the area Tuesday Morning.

It comes after a Sunday soaker that brought more than an inch of rain to some parts of Southern California.

Voluntary evacuations for the Silverado Canyon burn area are planned to take place at 8am due to potential flooding and debris flows. The evacuation advisory is for homes east of 30311 Silverado Canyon Road. The voluntary evacuations have a potential to be upgraded to mandatory evacuations during the storm.

In Glendora at 6am, the alert level is being upgraded to Orange which means voluntary evacuations will also take place. This alert level effects residents in the Colby Fire Impact area.

Crews fresh from a rock slides slide in Ventura were bracing for up to 2 inches of quick falling rain, while people were preparing for even worse in Azuza where there could be a possible 5 inches of rainfall.

It comes less than a year after the disastrous Colby fire, which torched the mountain side and left the area prone to mudslides. Resident Ed Heinlein, who is preparing for the latest bad weather as best he can, has already been affected, while others were evacuating their homes until the storm passes.

“It was all the way four feet around the house. This whole area was under four to ten feet of mud. Last year during the flash flood they said it came down at 60 miles an hour,” Heinlein, said, “I’m gone beyond nervous, I’m down to the grim reality of you fight it, you do what you can, you deal with it. You can’t sit around worrying about it, you work through it.”

The next round of rain is expected to arrive Tuesday morning. It could possibly hit during the morning commute, and continue into Wednesday. Rain totals are forecast to exceed those of Sunday’s storm, which dropped just over an inch of rain in Whittier, Agoura Hills and other communities.

It comes less than a year after the disastrous Colby fire, which torched the mountain side and left the area prone to mudslides. Resident Ed Heinlein, who is preparing for the latest bad weather as best he can, has already been affected, while others were evacuating their homes until the storm passes.

“It was all the way four feet around the house. This whole area was under four to ten feet of mud. Last year during the flash flood they said it came down at 60 miles an hour,” Heinlein, said, “I’m gone beyond nervous, I’m down to the grim reality of you fight it, you do what you can, you deal with it. You can’t sit around worrying about it, you work through it.”

The next round of rain is expected to arrive Tuesday morning. It could possibly hit during the morning commute, and continue into Wednesday. Rain totals are forecast to exceed those of Sunday’s storm, which dropped just over an inch of rain in Whittier, Agoura Hills and other communities.

The upcoming storm will likely bring rainfall and possibly snow to a widespread area of California, which has received only light to moderate rainfall since Oct. 1, the start of the drought-stricken state’s water year. Three years of drought have left the state’s water reservoirs at critically low levels as snowpack in the Sierras, a critical source of spring runoff shared by 25 million Californians, has diminished.

About 2 feet of snow is possible in the Sierra above 7,000 feet.

Nearly 80 percent of the state is under extreme drought, the second most severe category listed by the U.S. Drought Monitor. One year ago, about 28 percent of the state was under the severe drought category.

Significant drought relief would likely require a strong El Nino system, the tropical Pacfic Ocean phenomenon that affects weather patterns. Strong El Nino systems draw moisture into California, but a weak system probably would not generate enough rainfall this winter to significantly improve drought conditions.

The latest estimates place the chance of El Nino at 58 percent.

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About Earth Changes Media w/ Mitch Battros

Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.
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