Hurricane Iselle Could Reach Big Island On Thursday


http://earthchangesmedia.com/hurricane-iselle-could-reach-big-island-on-thursday
Hurricane Iselle continues to pack maximum sustained winds of 140 mph as the Category 4 storm churns less than 1,200 miles east-southeast of the Big Island. Iselle is expected to reach the Big Island as a tropical storm on Thursday.
The eye of the hurricane, which is nearly 28 miles wide, was…

Hurricane Iselle continues to pack maximum sustained winds of 140 mph as the Category 4 storm churns less than 1,200 miles east-southeast of the Big Island. Iselle is expected to reach the Big Island as a tropical storm on Thursday.

The eye of the hurricane, which is nearly 28 miles wide, was located 1,190 miles east-southeast of Hilo as of 11 a.m. Monday, Central Pacific Hurricane Center forecast meteorologist Tom Birchard said. Iselle is moving west at 10 mph and is expected to cross directly over the Big Island as a tropical storm sometime mid-Thursday.

“Iselle is a credible threat (to the Hawaiian Islands) and people do need to think about preparing for the chance of strong winds and wind-driven rainfall,” he said. “People definitely want to be prepared.”

Birchard said models currently indicate a 44 percent chance of damaging tropical storm force winds affecting Hilo and a 40 percent chance of tropical storm force winds in Kailua-Kona starting Thursday and continuing into Friday. Tropical storm force winds range between 39 and 73 mph.

There is a 2 percent chance of hurricane force winds — wind speeds of 74 mph or greater — for Kailua-Kona and a 3 percent chance of hurricane force winds for Hilo, he said. The center plans to launch on Tuesday a reconnaissance aircraft to sample the environment in and around the storm to provide additional information for forecast models.

In addition to damaging winds and flash flooding, Birchard said the storm will generate large surf along the Big Island’s east-facing shores starting as early as Wednesday evening.

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center, which is based in Honolulu, will begin issuing watches and/or warnings about 48 hours in advance of damaging winds and heavy rain reaching the islands, he said.

A slight decrease in forward speed is forecast for Iselle later Monday, before the storm makes a turn toward the west-northwest on Tuesday. Forecasters expect little change in Iselle’s strength on Monday, however, the storm is expected to gradually weaken during the next couple of days as it encounters wind shear near the Hawaiian Islands.

Hurricane force winds currently extend outward up to 35 miles and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 105 miles, according to forecasters.

Hurricane Iselle is expected to cross into the Central North Pacific Basin Center, which is located between 140 degrees west longitude and the International Dateline, on Tuesday morning. Both the Central Pacific Hurricane Center and National Hurricane Center are currently issuing advisories on the storm. Once Iselle enters the Central North Pacific Basin, the Central Pacific Hurricane Center will assume sole responsibility for issuing advisories and forecasts.

After Iselle passes the Hawaiian Islands, Birchard cautiuoned that another system, Tropical Storm Julio, is expected to arrive on Saturday or Sunday. For more details on Julio, click here.

“After Iselle, we’re not safe,” Birchard said. “Even if Iselle is a near miss, Julio still exists.”

Central Pacific Hurricane Center forecasters are also issuing advisories on Tropical Depression Genevieve, which was located about 1,000 miles southwest of Honolulu at 11 a.m. Monday. The depression is packing maximum sustained winds near 35 mph as it moves west-northwest around 18 mph.

Forecasters expect little change in Genevieve’s strength on Monday, however, gradual strengthening is expected Monday night into Tuesday, according to the center.

Central Pacific Hurricane Center forecasters are also keeping tabs on an area of disorganized showers and thunderstorms that are associated with an area of low pressure about 450 miles south of Hilo. The system is moving west around 10 to 15 mph. Forecasters gave the system a zero percent chance of forming into a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours.

Elsewhere, in the Central Pacific, no tropical cyclones are expected through Wednesday morning.

Central Pacific Hurricane Center officials predicted four to seven tropical cyclones this year in the Central North Pacific Basin. Overall, they give this season an 80 percent chance for a normal to above average number of tropical storms to form.

The Central Pacific hurricane season began June 1 and ends Nov. 30.

– See more at: http://westhawaiitoday.com/hurricane-season-2014/hurricane-iselle-could-reach-big-island-thursday#sthash.DgKOYVoJ.dpuf

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About Earth Changes Media w/ Mitch Battros

Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.
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