NASA Eyes Powerful Bands Of Thunderstorms In Newborn Tropical Storm Iselle


http://earthchangesmedia.com/nasa-eyes-powerful-bands-of-thunderstorms-in-newborn-tropical-storm-iselle
Tropical Storm Iselle was born in the Eastern Pacific Ocean soon after NASA’s Aqua satellite gathered infrared imagery on the storm that showed powerful thunderstorms wrapping into developing storm’s center. Iselle is not close enough to land to cause any watches or warnings.
The…

Tropical Storm Iselle was born in the Eastern Pacific Ocean soon after NASA’s Aqua satellite gathered infrared imagery on the storm that showed powerful thunderstorms wrapping into developing storm’s center. Iselle is not close enough to land to cause any watches or warnings.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over System 95E on July 31 at 5:23 p.m. EDT from gathered infrared data before it became Tropical Storm Iselle. The data was made into a false-colored image at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The AIRS data showed a large band of powerful thunderstorms west of Iselle’s center wrapping into the storm. The thunderstorms had cloud top temperatures as cold as -63F/-52C indicating the cloud tops were near the top of the troposphere.

National Hurricane Center forecaster Blake noted in an August 1 discussion “A recent AMSU microwave pass also suggests that the inner core has become better defined, with perhaps a partial eyewall in the eastern semicircle.” Advanced microwave sounding unit (AMSU) is a multi-channel microwave radiometer installed on meteorological satellites, including NASA’s Aqua satellite that carries the AIRS instrument.

Tropical storm Iselle was born on July 31 at 2100 UTC (5 p.m. EDT). On August 1, Iselle’s maximum sustained winds were already up to 60 mph (95 kph). At 5 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. PDT/0900 UTC).the center of Tropical Storm Iselle was located near latitude 13.5 north and longitude 124.6 west. Iselle is centered about 1,160 miles (1,870 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.

Iselle was moving toward the west-northwest near 10 mph (17 kph) and is expected to continue moving in that direction over the next couple of days.

Satellite data indicate that tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 105 miles (165 km) from the center, making the storm about 210 miles in diameter.
NHC noted that environmental conditions appear conducive for further strengthening over the next couple of days. Those conditions include light-to-moderate northeasterly shear and warm water.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) expects Iselle to reach hurricane status by August 2

Related posts:

Advertisements

About Earth Changes Media w/ Mitch Battros

Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s