U.S. Scientists To Map Interior Of Mount St. Helens Volcano


http://earthchangesmedia.com/u-s-scientists-to-map-interior-of-mount-st-helens-volcano
A series of explosions set off by a team of scientists were expected to rattle Washington state’s Mount St. Helens on Wednesday as researchers map the interior of the volcano, whose 1980 eruption was the deadliest in U.S. history.
Mount St. Helens, about 95 miles (150 km) south of Seattle…

A series of explosions set off by a team of scientists were expected to rattle Washington state’s Mount St. Helens on Wednesday as researchers map the interior of the volcano, whose 1980 eruption was the deadliest in U.S. history.

Mount St. Helens, about 95 miles (150 km) south of Seattle and 50 miles (80 km) north of Portland, erupted in an explosion of hot ash in May 1980, spewing debris over a wide area, killing 57 people and causing more than a billion dollars in damage.

Scientists from across the United States are trying to get a better handle on the magma stores and internal workings of the 8,300-foot (2,530-meter) volcano to improve warning systems prior to eruption.

“Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes in the Cascade Range threaten urban centers from Vancouver to Portland,” lead scientist Alan Levander of Rice University in Houston said in a statement.

“We’d like to better understand their inner workings in order to better predict when they may erupt and how severe those eruptions are likely to be,” he said.

On Wednesday, geophysicists from across the United States were to begin running seismic waves through the volcano’s interior by firing “shots” at the mountain to install mapping instruments deep underground.

The instruments will help create a sort of CAT scan on the interior and will “illuminate the architecture of the greater Mount St. Helens magmatic system from slab to surface,” according to researchers from the project, called Imaging Magma Under St. Helens, or iMUSH (imush.org/)

A total of 23 boreholes 80 feet (24 meters) deep were to be installed by July 31, said researcher Steve Malone.

“These shots are done at night to give the best chance of recording good signals without other vibrations being present such as from wind or vehicle traffic,” Malone said.

Residents living near Mount St. Helens were unlikely to feel the shots because of their depth, but their insertion approximates a magnitude 2 earthquake, scientists said.

In May, the U.S. Geological Survey said that magma levels were slowly rebuilding inside Mount St. Helens, but there was no sign of an impending eruption.

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Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.
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