Tornado Wreckage Revealed In Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma


http://earthchangesmedia.com/tornado-wreckage-revealed-in-arkansas-kansas-oklahoma
Tornadoes, as one of nature’s most unpredictable disasters, can strike pretty much anywhere across the central U.S., and come in a dizzying variety of shapes and sizes.
Yet the physical damage they leave behind often looks very much the same — denuded trees, shattered brick, piles of soggy …

Tornadoes, as one of nature’s most unpredictable disasters, can strike pretty much anywhere across the central U.S., and come in a dizzying variety of shapes and sizes.

Yet the physical damage they leave behind often looks very much the same — denuded trees, shattered brick, piles of soggy wood. It’s that kind of damage the National Weather Service uses to help calculate the strength of a twister, and it’s that kind of wreckage that was widely displayed on social media after the worst tornado outbreak of the year struck several states Sunday.

At least 16 people were killed in Sunday’s storms, with 14 of those killed near Little Rock, Ark., as a twister or series of twisters scoured a path through the central part of the state. On this National Weather Service graphic of severe storm reports, you can see the endurance of the Arkansas storm reflected in the line of red dots (signifying the sighting of a tornado) moving northeast through the state.

In Arkansas, the twister crossed Interstate 40, a crucial trucking artery out of Little Rock, while drivers were still on the road, then thrashed the town of Mayflower before continuing northeast to Vilonia and beyond. The National Weather Service reported that Arkansas Game and Fish Commission headquartered east of Mayflower had been destroyed.

“It’s very, very, very bad,” one official radioed Sunday on an emergency channel while driving down I-40, reporting a ghastly scene of flattened tractor-trailers and flipped cars. “People are in stretchers.”

Another official radioed, “We’re hearing people yell for help.”

Rescue efforts then continued through the night, with the death toll mounting.

Carly Dear, 22, a University of Central Arkansas student in Conway, arrived on the scene Sunday evening around 8 p.m., and the damage was so bad that she couldn’t tell whether the wrecked cars she saw had been tossed off the highway or had come from a local junkyard.

“The surroundings changed immediately, you could tell where [the tornado] started, what it went through,” Dear told The Times. “The power lines were chopped in half, the trees were chopped in half, the RV park was completely gone, we couldn’t tell where we were because everything was just scattered.”

“We could still see how bad it was even though it was really dark,” Dear said, adding, “the strength of the tornado threw the entire frame of a mobile home over the access road, almost landing on I-40.”.

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About Earth Changes Media w/ Mitch Battros

Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.
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